Paint Stains

Removing oil base paint from non-washable fibres

To remove oil based paint stains from acetate, burlap, fibreglass, rayon, rope, silk, triacetate or wool:

  1. Gently scrape to remove the excess paint and then sponge the stain with a dry-cleaning solvent such as Afta Cleaning Fluid.
  2. Apply a dry spotter to the area and cover with an absorbent pad dampened with dry spotter. Leave it to stand as long as any stain is being removed.
  3. Change the pad as it picks up the stain. Keep both the stain and pad moist with dry spotter.
  4. Apply stain remover to loosen staining material and residue from stain removers and allow to dry
  5. If stain persists, sponge with water and apply a wet spotter and a few drops of ammonia. (Do not use ammonia on wool or silk)
  6. Cover stain with an absorbent pad moistened with wet spotter. Let it stand as long as any stain is being removed
  7. Change the pad as it picks up the stain. Keep both the pad and stain moist with wet spotter and ammonia
  8. Flush well with water and repeat as necessary

Warning: Oil based paints are the most difficult to clean since they require paint thinner to clean once dried.

These materials should NEVER be used on a hardwood or vinyl floor as they will completely destroy the finish in the affected area.

Using such solvents on carpet or rugs is questionable – please check any care labels and/or manufacturer’s brochures and test in a very inconspicuous area.

Removing oil base paint from hard surfaces

To remove oil base paint stains from acrylic, plastic, plexiglas, polyurethane and vinyl clothing:

  1. Wipe away the excess immediately with a cloth dipped in warm soapy water
  2. Rinse thoroughly with warm water and wipe dry. Do not use a thinner on these materials as it will eat through them
  3. If necessary, dip a cloth into a dry cleaning and quickly but gently dab at the remaining stain
  4. Rinse well and wipe dry

Removing dried water base paint from carpet

Option 1

  1. Remove as much of the dried-on paint as possible using water, an old toothbrush, and maybe even some needle nose pliers
  2. Wet the area, and try to see if any of the colour will blot up. It’s not likely, but it’s always worth a go!
  3. Then, use your toothbrush to really scrub the carpet and remove as much of the paint as possible
  4. If you have a large area of dry paint, needle nose pliers are great to squeeze at the paint and get it to flex and/or break enough for you to pull it off the carpet. Let the area dry and then vacuum to see what remains.
  5. If you can’t get all the paint stains off, then please speak to a flooring specialist at your local DIY Store for the best cleaning solvent for your carpet.

Option 2

  1. When all else fails, it’s time to become a carpet stylist. You’ll need a small pair of sharp scissors, a steady hand, and patience!
  2. Get down on the floor and really examine the affected carpet fibres. Often, you’ll find that just the tips of the fibres are paint-coated and not the whole fibre
  3. Select the fibre with the most paint collected on its stem, and clip it out. Clip it as close to the top as possible white still removing the paint-covered portion
  4. After you clip the fibre, step back and look at the carpet to see how much of the stain is still visible
  5. Repeat cautiously, removing as few fibres as possible while making the stain appear to have never happened. If you get much beyond 5 fibres, stop and come back later. Unlike a bad haircut, carpet doesn’t grow back and you don’t want to leave a bald spot that you’ll regret!

Removing wet water based paint from carpets

  1. The best time to remove paint from your flooring is when it’s wet
  2. You will need white paper towels or disposable paper rags and water
  3. Form a barrier around the paint spill with dry towels. Saturate the stain with clean water
  4. Immediately soak up the water and paint with towels and throw the soaked towels away
  5. Repeat the steps 3 & 4 until the paint is gone
  6. You may need to use a carpet cleaning product at the end to remove the final colour remnant, but be sure not to use one until your wet towels are staying white after blotting the carpet.

Removing dried water based paint from hard flooring

  1. Use a dull knife or something with a blunt scraping edge to scrape up the paint.
  2. If you can’t get all the paint stain off, speak to a flooring specialist at your local DIY store for the best heavy-duty cleaning solvent for your type of flooring.

Removing wet water based paint from hard flooring

  1. The best time to remove paint from your flooring is when it’s wet
  2. You will need white paper towels or disposable paper rags and water
  3. Using a damp towel, wipe as much of the paint as you can
  4. If some paint has seeped into joints in the flooring, use a toothpick to scrape it out of the joint.

Removing Paint from Fabrics

1. To remove paint from water-based latex, acrylic, emulsion and school paints, rinse wet stains under running water then wash according to the fabric care label.

2. For dried paints, those that are oil or varnished based, sponge carefully with white spirit or a proprietary paintbrush cleaner (apply in small amounts, and test on a small area before proceeding) before washing.